Okay, the name is a bit of a turn-off, but the Spotted Dick itself is rich and delicious. It is no wonder it is one of Britain’s favorites.

Spotted Dick

Spotted Dick
 
Serve hot with custard (Creme Anglaise, recipe included).
Author:
Recipe type: Dessert
Cuisine: British
Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • 2 ounces plain flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon mixed spice
  • pinch of salt
  • 2 ounces shredded suet
  • 1 ounce white or brown sugar
  • 4 ounces currants or sultanas
  • 2 ounces fresh breadcrumbs
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 4 to 5 Tablespoons milk
Creme Anglaise
  • 1 1/4 Cups heavy cream
  • 4 egg yolks, large
  • 1/2 Cup sugar
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 3 Tablespoons Grand Marnier
Instructions
  1. Butter a 1.5 pint pudding basin.
  2. Sift the flour, baking powder, spice and salt into a mixing bowl and mix in the suet, sugar, fruit and bread- crumbs. Stir in the egg and sufficient milk to produce a soft consistency that drops off the spoon in 5 seconds.
  3. Turn the mixture into the pudding basin, which should be two-thirds full. Cover with greased foil.
  4. Steam for 2 to 2.5 hours.
  5. When cooked, remove the cover and allow the pudding to shrink slightly, then cover the basin with a hot serving plate, hold it firmly and invert.
  6. Lift off the basin to leave the pudding on the plate.
Creme Anglaise:
  1. Heat cream in saucepan, but do not boil. In another saucepan, combine egg yolks, sugar, and salt, beating until light yellow in color. Add hot cream to egg yolk mixture and stir until blended.
  2. Cook over medium heat until sauce thickens, stirring with a wooden spoon. Cool. Add Grand Marnier just before serving.
Notes
Spotted dick is a steamed suet pudding containing dried fruit (usually currants) commonly served with custard, and a standard part of English cuisine. Spotted refers to the dried fruit (which resemble spots) and dick may be a contraction/corruption of the word pudding (from the last syllable) or possibly a corruption of the word dough.[1] Another explanation offered for the latter half of the name is that it comes from the German word for "thick," in reference to the thickened suet mixture.

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