Dry-cured ham from Parma in Italy, made from pigs fed whey of Parmigiano-Reggiano, resulting in a distinct nutty taste.  It is served uncooked, often being added to appetizers such as Prosciutto e Melone, or entrees such as Tortellini con Prosciutto e Bisi.  It is a favorite on pizzas and in salads. The word prosciutto is believed to stem from Latin pro + exsuctus (past participle of exsugere “to suck out the moisture”).

The term “Prosciutto di Parma” is protected under the European Union’s Common Agricultural Policy, ensuring that only prosciutto hams made in Parma may use the term, specifically.  Other prosciutto products however are made outside Parma and in recent years an explosion of growth has spread production to Croatia, Slovenia, Canada, Portugal and Serbia.

Prosciutto di Parma remains a particular favorite among gourmands who willingly pay a  higher price for the flavor and quality of the genuine product.

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One Response to Prosciutto di Parma

  1. […] version is slightly different than most others I’ve seen in that it uses only prosciutto, which is dry-cured Italian ham. Although the meat is already cooked, we boil it further to lessen […]

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