An oval winter squash with a ribbed, dark green skin and slightly sweet orange flesh. May be eaten baked or directly from the shell. The word squash comes from the Massachusetts Indian word “asquash,” meaning “eaten green.”

Acorn Squash
A popular squash named for its resemblance to a large ribbed acorn. Acorn squash is typically green. New varieties are white (Table Queen) or a pumpkin color (Golden Acorn). All varieties have a firm yellow-orange flesh. Native to the Americas, the first European settlers thought squash to be a type of melon since they had never seen them before. The term acorn squash first appeared in print in 1937.

Season: available year-round

How to select: Choose a squash with a smooth, dry rind with no cracks or soft spots. The squash should have a dull rind. A shiny rind means it was picked too early and will not have full sweetness. Select a squash with as much green on the rind as possible. Too much orange means the squash is over ripe and it will be dry and stringy.

How to store: Store in a cool, dry place for approximately 3 months. Squash can be refrigerated, but it will deteriorate quickly and should only be refrigerated 1-2 weeks.

How to prepare: Cut in half and remove the seeds, then bake. Remove the flesh from the skin then boil or steam.

Matches well with: bacon, brown sugar, butter, garlic, honey, maple syrup, nutmeg, Parmesan cheese, pepper, sage.

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